PRCIL's Newsletter

"Focus not on the differences of people with disabilities,

but on the talent of the individual." Neil Milliken

March is the time we begin to see warmer weather and the beautiful blossoms of spring. This has been a cold winter for East Texas, and many of us are eager to be able to spend some time outdoors.
Wishing everyone a great spring 2018.

Resources for Parents with Children with Disabilities

This website is especially for families and parents of children with disabilities or special health-care needs and is designed to offer support, inspiration, resources, and links to services available.

BE PREPARED!

Thunderstorms & Lightning

 

All thunderstorms are dangerous. Every thunderstorm produces lightning. While lightning fatalities have decreased over the past 30 years, lightning continues to be one of the top three storm-related killers in the United States. On average in the U.S., lightning kills 51 people and injures hundreds more. Although most lightning victims survive, people struck by lightning often report a variety of long-term, debilitating symptoms.

Other associated dangers of thunderstorms include tornadoes, strong winds, hail and flash flooding. Flash flooding is responsible for more fatalities than any other thunderstorm-associated hazard– more than 140 annually. Dry thunderstorms are falling raindrops which evaporate, but lightning can still reach the ground and start wildfires. They are most prevalent in the western United States.

Thunderstorms Facts

 

  • They may occur singly, in clusters, or in lines

  • Some of the most severe occur when a single thunderstorm affects one location for an extended time

  • Thunderstorms typically produce heavy rain for a brief period, anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour

  • Warm, humid conditions are highly favorable for thunderstorm development

  • About 10 percent of thunderstorms are classified as severe – one that produces hail at least an inch or larger in diameter, has winds of 58 miles per hour or higher or produces a tornado

Thunderstorms Facts

 

  • They may occur singly, in clusters or in lines.

  • Some of the most severe occur when a single thunderstorm affects one location for an extended time.

  • Thunderstorms typically produce heavy rain for a brief period, anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour.

  • Warm, humid conditions are highly favorable for thunderstorm development.

  • About 10 percent of thunderstorms are classified as severe – one that produces hail at least an inch or larger in diameter, has winds of 58 miles per hour or higher or produces a tornado.

Lightning Facts

 

  • Lightning’s unpredictability increases the risk to individuals and property

  • Lightning often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall

  • “Heat lightning” is actually lightning from a thunderstorm too far away from thunder to be heard; however, the storm may be moving in your direction

  • Most lightning deaths and injuries occur when people are caught outdoors in the summer months during the afternoon and evening

  • Chances of being struck by lightning are estimated to be 1 in 600,000 but could be reduced even further by following safety precautions

  • Lightning victims carry no electrical charge and should be attended to immediately

Going to college today can mean attending a 4-year college or university, a 2-year community college, a technical institute, or trade school. It can mean working toward a bachelor’s degree, an associate’s degree (A.A.), or a certificate showing mastery of skills needed for a technical career. It can mean studying full-time or part-time, living at school or commuting from home.

Preparing for college includes taking any necessary assessments (e.g. SATs), ensuring current diagnostic test results are available to document the student's disability, developing self-advocacy skills, and other steps depending on the selected type of college program.

PACER’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment is a website full of resources for the transitioning youth. The road to adulthood for youth with disabilities is filled with opportunity, and parents play a key role. PACER’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment is ready with the information families want, presented in a way families can use.

PACER’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment provides relevant information and resources to parents, youth, and professionals through a variety of services:

  • A new, cutting-edge website that inspires, educates, and engages families around transition

  • Technical assistance and training to professionals on best practices for engaging families, including those who are underserved

  • In-person and online workshops for parents of youth on topics such as assistive technology, postsecondary supports, and finding work in the community

OPENING HOURS

MONDAY - THURSDAY

7:30 am - 5:30 pm

ADDRESS

421 AVENUE A

PALESTINE, TEXAS 75801

PHONE  903-729-7505

TOLL FREE 888-326-5166

FAX  903-729-7540

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